HUNTING & NOT COMING BACK!

Think about being in heavy fog and not being able to see 3 feet in front of you…

BEING PREPARED IS EVERYTHING

Recently there was an article published in Field & Stream (October 2017) about a father and son hunting and getting lost in the rugged Siskiyou Mountains of Oregon.   One never made it back… The other his son forgot his GPS and Phone when heading back out to find his dad, he was lost for a number of days…  Searchers finally located him!

“From 1997-2016, 80 have been found dead and another 76 not found”  In this region of Oregon

Some of those that were never found, could have had other issues, such as venturing into a spot they did not belong in…

I know this number could be a lot less, if one were well prepared to the venture into the rugged mountains of the North America.  Most feel they know all the ways back to camp from any location.  Think about being in the Snake River Canyon in the morning at 65 degrees and sunny chasing a herd of Elk and in the afternoon the weather changing to a blizzard with the temperature dropping to below freezing and your horse has been moved from where you tether him up on the trail, plus you must venture into dark timber and any hint of daylight is about gone…

There is no hiker, hunter or outdoor enthusiast that has not gotten mixed up while in the field…  Today there is so much technology to keep you from staying mixed up, lost permanently, or dying in the outdoor from being lost…

Touch screen GPS that works in deep timber.

So many time when trying to help hunters find places to hunt, I request them to have a Garmin GPS, onX HUNT mapping for both the Garmin GPS (colored – microchip capable) and mobile device, such as the smart phones which 90% of hunters and outdoor enthusiasts carry with them 24/7.

Emergency Beacon
Needs to be registered.

The Garmin GPS, at least in the 21st should have WAAS (Wide Area Augmentable System) Note: Global Positioning System GPS is made up of at least 24 satellites, working in all conditions 24 hours a day and is FREE.

Garmin Rino 755 has two way and your location is available to another user. This is one that I highly recommend.

I would say at least 40% tell me they are “Old School” and use paper maps and a compass (that is maybe on the compass).

Just one little note with onX HUNT on the mobile side there is a trail layer that features trails old and new (CONUS).   Another tool that can help in many hunting areas.

Let’s get real about paper maps, most are outdated, and boundaries change all the time.  I threw out all my paper maps, that I have had for more than 30 years with all the X’s on them, moving the X’s to my GPS.  Paper maps are outdate in field use and lacking the ability to Zoom in.  Even if you mark your map with routes, it surely isn’t going let you do an active route back to camp or truck as a GPS would do.  As for the compass, it’s Okay, if your batteries go dead or enemy decides to use an electromagnetic pulse or EMP while you’re in the back country.

These can reach out many miles and reasonable in price in the pairs.

Beside the Garmin GPS, Mobile Phone with the onX HUNT APP and chip, there is the 2 Ways such as Motorola handheld communicators, and last but not lease is an Emergency Locator Beacon, just in case you’re in real trouble and are immobile…  

We must remember to have them in our backpack or ditty bag (U.S. NAVY), along with the other tools used in the field.  Frank Biggs 

 

8 thoughts on “HUNTING & NOT COMING BACK!”

  1. Good article Frank. I agree about the old paper maps. I used to get them from my father-in-law who was a surveyor for BPA. They were great topo maps but are very antiquated now. I don’t hunt anymore (heart) but will definitely pass on the GPS info to my nephews who do.
    CTOC Lyle V. U.S.N. Spook Retired

  2. Norm, in some ways we get smarter with age when it comes to Hunting. We don’t take so many chances and look at hunting a bit differently. It is not about going deep always, but using what is right in front of us and getting it done. Frank Biggs Sr.

  3. I’m not very good with directions and navigation, but before the advent of the inexpensive GPS I would check a map and remember that worse case scenario, all I would have to do is, for example, go South for five miles to hit a road. All I needed was a compass. I’ve been turned around and confused to the point where I didn’t believe my compass, but took its advice in spite of my objections. Now I have GPS (2), cell phone, onX maps, compasses, two way radio(s), battery charger, and spare batteries. I should get a spot locator, as I’m getting old and I’m already pretty much broke down. The upside, is I probably couldn’t get any further than 4 or 5 miles away from my rig if I tried.

    Norm A.

  4. Tom, that is all well and good to old guys from the 20th Century. There is more to dead reckoning, such as ships at sea. Hmm! Just heading off with the compass in bad weather tough terrain is not always smart. One thing to be doing direct travel with the compass in the desert with nothing in the way. Go to Google Earth and check out the Rogue Wilderness or the Snake River. Be there in a White Out and see how the compass does… Most GPS have a Compass.
    I don,t use the Telegraph any longer…

    Cobra Dog

  5. ALL THIS HI – TECH STUFF SOUNDS GREAT, HOWEVER,
    A SIMPLE COMPASS THAT YOU TIE TO YOUR SHIRT WILL DO THE TRICK. TAKE A HEADING AS YOU LEAVE CAMP IS ALL THAT IS REQUIRED. THE SOUND OF A HUNTER CRYING OUT “I’M LOST WHEN HE IS ONLY A SHORT DISTANCE FROM THE LOGGING ROAD IS PATHETIC ”

    Tom D.

  6. You are spot on Frankie , I just lost a friend and co-worker about one year ago in Spokane,
    Due to not having the right gear and GPS
    And panicking after dark and not going to ground and toughing out the cold night and hunkering down and staying put till first light and possibly starting a fire of some sort if possible, In this case he was not on lucks side
    And we lost Eddy due to all the above!!!
    My God rest his soul, and my he hunt for
    Eternity …..? Bone Man

  7. I couldn’t agree with you more. We should all be prepared for an emergency situation in the woods. I’ve been turned around and depended on my GPS to find camp. This last year I bought an InReach. I won’t venture into the woods without it. Aside from GPS, it also allows me to text messages via satellite, and it has an emergency system button. It works remarkably well. Kim

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